< Back to The Tiffany Story The World of Tiffany

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Tiffany opens its doors on September 14, 1837 at 259 Broadway in New York. The first day’s sales total is $4.98.

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The Tiffany Blue Box is introduced.

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The Catalogue of Useful and Fancy Articles sold everything from horse whips to French sugarplums. Now, the Blue Book features the world’s rarest and most beautiful jewels.

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During the Civil War, Tiffany creates ceremonial swords for Generals Sherman, Grant and others.

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The Tiffany Diamond is not for sale; but Tiffany creates many other spectacular jewels featuring stones of astonishing size and beauty.

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The Tiffany® Setting paves the way for a collection of legendary Tiffany engagement rings.

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Tiffany purchases the French Crown Jewels in 1887 and America’s high society clamors to own them.

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Kunzite is named after George Kunz in 1902. Tiffany introduces tanzanite in 1968, discovered by Tiffany gemologists in the adventurous spirit of Kunz.

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Louis Comfort Tiffany is considered a world leader of the Art Nouveau movement.

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This 1901 brooch continues to inspire Tiffany’s spectacular jewels today.

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Tiffany designers create the U.S. Navy Medal of Honor, a non-combat distinction used by the Department of the Navy from 1917 to 1942. Rear Admiral Byrd, Jr. is awarded this medal, known as the “Tiffany Cross,” for being the first to reach the North Pole.

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Gene Moore joins Tiffany in 1955 and transforms the New York flagship windows into magical mini-theaters.

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The lavish, nature-inspired designs of Schlumberger are worn by the world’s most glamorous women.

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Tiffany has produced the NFL Vince Lombardi Super Bowl trophy since the first Super Bowl in 1967.

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In 1968 Tiffany is commissioned to create the White House china service for President Lyndon B. Johnson and the First Lady.

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Audrey Hepburn wears the Ribbon Rosette necklace set with the Tiffany Diamond while promoting “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”

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Elsa Peretti revolutionizes modern jewelry design.

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In 1980, Paloma Picasso’s debut Tiffany collection is introduced.

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Inspired by the clock that has crowned the entrance to Tiffany’s New York store since 1853, the Atlas® collection launches in 1995.

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Bird on a Rock, one of Schlumberger’s beloved whimsical designs.

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Like all Tiffany diamonds, the Lucida® is cut to maximize brilliance.

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The mission of The Tiffany & Co. Foundation is environmental preservation and social responsibility.

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Pioneering architect Frank Gehry establishes a groundbreaking partnership with Tiffany in 2004.

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The Tiffany Novo® diamond is introduced in 2007, based on the cushion-cut Tiffany Diamond.

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The Tiffany Keys collection lets you mix key pendants and chains for a look that’s all your own.

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In honor of our 175th anniversary, RUBEDO® debuts in Tiffany 1837™ designs.

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This astonishing 128.54-carat yellow diamond is suspended from over 100 carats of white diamonds.

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1837

Did you know?

In 1851, Tiffany was the first American company to institute the 925/1000 sterling silver standard which was later adopted by the United States. This precious metal comprises Tiffany’s hollowware, like this 1853 pitcher, and gleams today in chic jewelry designs.

In 1845, Tiffany publishes the first mail-order catalogue in the U.S.

1840–1860s

In 1878, Charles Lewis Tiffany purchases a 287-carat fancy yellow diamond. It is cut to 128.54 carats and named the Tiffany Diamond.

1870s

1880s

Charles Lewis Tiffany introduces the Tiffany® Setting diamond engagement ring in 1886; and it’s played a part in the world’s greatest love stories ever since.

Tiffany gemologist George Kunz travels the far reaches of the world, finding rare gemstones that are still coveted today.

1890s

1900s

Louis Comfort Tiffany, son of Charles Lewis Tiffany, becomes the company’s first official design director in 1902.

The venerable Tiffany flagship store opens its doors at the corner of 57th Street and Fifth Avenue.

1910–1940s

Did you know?

In 1926, the United States adopts Tiffany’s standard of purity (95 percent) as the country’s official standard for platinum.

Legendary designer Jean Schlumberger joins Tiffany in 1956.

1950s

Audrey Hepburn® embraces Tiffany’s New York style in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”

1960s

Did you know?

Andy Warhol collaborated with Tiffany, creating holiday cards for Tiffany & Co.

© 2009 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

Elsa Peretti is introduced in the 1974–1975 Blue Book:

“Sculptured, organic, sensuous are all words that describe the work of Elsa Peretti, a young jewelry designer with great respect for natural form.”

1970s

Photo Credit © Jill Krementz

1980s

Paloma Picasso becomes famous for her bold, fearless designs.

1990s

In 1995, the Louvre Museum hosts “A Diamond in the City,” a retrospective of Jean Schlumberger’s work.

In 1999, Tiffany introduces Lucida®, a stunning cut decades in development.

The Tiffany & Co. Foundation is established in 2000.

2000s

Tiffany Keys launch in 2009.

In 2012, Tiffany & Co. celebrates 175 years of legendary style.

2010s

Tiffany introduces its RUBEDO® metal in 2012.

The Tiffany Diamond is reset in honor of our 175th anniversary.

The Tiffany T collection is introduced in 2014.